CSEHub Publishes Newsletter on Food Security

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Since the World Food Summit in 1996 communities around the world have become more concerned about food security. Though in Canada we often consider ourselves fortunate to have a great and varied food supply there are many reasons for us to be concerned. For example, many farmers are struggling to make a living wage, local food production is not enough to supply demand for local food, food-borne illnesses have been making national news, and monoculture is making our farms ever more reliant on pesticides and fertilizers. These are just a few of the reasons for concern.

Through the Canadian Social Economy Research Partnerships (CSERP) researchers and practitioners across Canada are investigating how the Social Economy is addressing food security and how it can be doing more. Now CSERP is engaging with producers, communities and other stakeholders to use the research to identify next steps in creating a sustainable food and agriculture policy and system for Canada. Seeking input on this will be the next stage in our work and we welcome your involvement.

Download the newsletter to learn more about the exciting work being done by across the Social Economy Research Partnerships, click here>>

 

 

 The Canadian Social Economy Hub

www.socialeconomyhub.ca

The Canadian Social Economy Hub (CSEHub) is located at the University of Victoria and is co-directed by Ian MacPherson and Rupert Downing. CSEHub undertakes research in order to understand and promote the Social Economy tradition within Canada and as a subject of academic enquiry within universities.

CSEHub is a Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) between the University of Victoria, represented by its principal investigator, and the Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDNet), represented by the designated co-director. CSEHub is directed by the two organizations and their representatives, with the advice and input of a board of representatives of regional nodes and national partners of the Canadian Social Economy Research Partnerships (CSERP).