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Overcoming Power and Privilege in Community Change

2:00pm to 3:00pm Eastern TimeA Tamarack Institute Webinar

As a community changemaker, have you ever stopped to wonder where the power lies in your project? What are you trying to achieve, and for whom? How does your place of power (as a creator and an individual) hinder your ability to relate to those you are trying to help? We often use power unknowingly in the work of change. But, when we recognize the influence of our training, politics, access, and privilege we allow ourselves to understand our clients, communities, and abilities more deeply. During this intimate conversation, George Aye of Greater Good Studio will help us understand the mechanics of power and how to wield it with care as we move forward in our community change efforts. 

Register for Overcoming Power and Privilege in Community Change

George Aye’s keynote presentation on Power and Privilege was the highlight of last-years Community Change Festival. By popular request, George is making that same experience available to those of you who weren’t able to attend. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from George on how to navigate issues of power and privilege in community change work!

Guest

George AyeGeorge Aye co-founded Greater Good Studio with the belief that design can lead to positive behaviour change. Previously, he spent seven years at global innovation firm IDEO before being hired as the first human-centred designer at the Chicago Transit Authority. Since founding Greater Good, he has worked across multiple social issues including autism, criminal justice, education, public health and health care. George is an Adjunct Full Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. With his co-founder, he was awarded the TED Prize City 2.0 (2012) and recognized in the Public Interest Design 100 list (2013). The studio’s work was featured in the Stanford Social Innovation Review (May 2018), LEAP Dialogues: Career Pathways in Design for Social Innovation (published 2016) and Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook (published 2015). He is a frequent speaker and workshop facilitator. 

About Greater Good Studio:

Greater Good Studio gives mission-driven organizations new ways to solve problems, big and small. We’ve adapted the practice of human-centred design to the unique needs of the social sector. Our approach builds the capacity of clients and communities to solve old problems in new ways. It is grounded in the following principles:

  • End users are the experts
  • Innovation doesn’t have to be fancy.
  • Less is more.
  • Capacity is built through hands-on experience.
  • Hard is not the same as impossible.

HostGalen MacLusky

Galen MacLusky is a Consulting Director of the Tamarack Institute’s Community Innovation Idea Area. He is passionate about working with community organizations to help build and scale new ideas that deepen their impact. An experienced design, innovation, and co-creation consultant, at the core of his work are approaches that help organizations engage with those who are impacted by their services and test new programs and services with minimal investment

How Do We Build Inclusive Communities?

A Cities Deepening Community Webinar1:00pm - 2:00pm Eastern Time

Speaker: Jim Diers

Loneliness and polarization are two growing threats to our society. Although these problems are different from one another, Jim Diers believes that the common solution is to build inclusive community and that the best place to do that is where we live.

In this webinar, Jim will share some tips and stories about making our neighbourhoods places where everyone feels included and connected across the differences that tend to divide and isolate so many of us.

Register for How Do We Build Inclusive Communities?

Speaker

Jim Diers, Asset-Based Community Development Institute

picture of Jim DiersJim has a passion for getting people engaged with their communities and in the decisions that affect their lives. His work in the Seattle Department of Neighbourhoods was recognized with an Innovations Award from the Kennedy School of Government. He was appointed the first director of Seattle's Department of Neighbourhoods in 1988 where he served under three mayors over the next 14 years creating what some would say is a miracle of neighbours where he put his passion to work for a direct-action neighbourhood association, a community development corporation, a community foundation, and the nation's largest health care cooperative.

He teaches courses at the University of Washington and serves on the faculty of the Asset-Based Community Development Institute. Jim travels internationally to deliver speeches and present workshop on neighbours and neighbourhoods. His book, Neighbor Power: Building Community the Seattle Way, is available in both English and Chinese editions.

Principles and Elements of Asset-Based Community Development

1:00pm to 2:00pm Eastern TimeA Vibrant Communities Webinar

Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) emphasizes strengths, connections, citizen leadership and recognizes that individual gifts become powerful when they are connected together. 

Join John McKnight and Cormac Russell as they dive deep into ABCD. They will review the principles and practices of ABCD and discuss their latest paper on the four elements that make ABCD a distinctive process.

To prepare for the webinar please read:  The Four Essential Elements of ABCD Process

Register for Principles and Elements of Asset-Based Community Development

Speakers

John McKnightJohn McKnight, Asset-Based Community Development Institute

John McKnight is a founder and co-director of Asset-Based Community Development Institute, whose graduates -- including both Michelle and Barack Obama -- continue to have impact strengthening communities and neighbourhoods around the world. In 2013, John was awarded an Honourary Doctorate from the University of Waterloo in recognition of his innovative work.

For three decades John has researched social service delivery systems, health policy, community organizations and neighbourhood policy. He is the author of The Careless Society and co-author ofBuilding Communities from the Inside Out and The Abundant Community. John serves on the Boards of several national organizations that support neighbourhood development and he remains tireless in his recognition and championing of citizens -- and their capacity to care for one another -- as an essential resource in the work of building better communities and neighbourhoods. 

Cormac RusselCormac Russell, Nurture Development

Cormac Russell is a faculty member of the ABCD Institute and an internationally-renowned thought leader, trainer and Speaker. He has supported the establishment of more than 30 ABCD learning sites in Rwanda, South Sudan, Kenya, Canada, Sweden, Ireland and the UK. He is driven by a passionate belief in the importance of localism, economic and environmental sovereignty, and is a strong advocate for the protection of indigenous living and social justice. Cormac —a long-time friend and collaborator with Professor John McKnight has published extensively in professional journals on Asset-Based approaches to Probation, Health, Ageing Well, Community Housing, Community Development and Disability.

Learn more from John McKnight and Cormac Russell at the upcoming ABCD: Healthy Neighbourhoods, Healthy Cities workshop in Edmonton on May 28-30.

Weaving Indigenous Wellbeing, Research and Ethics: Community and Campus Perspectives in Canada

12:00pm – 1:00pm Eastern Time
Online - Register for webinar link!

Cost: Free

Join us for Weaving Indigenous Wellbeing, Research and Ethics: Community and Campus Perspectives in Canada.

The webinar will feature the work and vision of four Indigenous leaders working in community-campus engagement. Two Professors from Saskatchewan and British Columbia and two community leaders from the National Association of Friendship Centres in Ottawa will focus on ethical research, Indigenous knowledges, equitable partnerships and how higher education and other Canadian allies can collectively support Indigenous community health and well being. They will explore the challenges they face, opportunities for the future, and specific recommendations for policy, funding, culture, and program changes.

Level: Beginner/Intermediate – Attendees do not need any prior experience or knowledge of indigenous research or community development. Check out the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network to learn more about the topic: www.uakn.org

Resources to read ahead of the webinar:

Pidgeon, M. (2018). Moving between theory and practice within an Indigenous research paradigm. Qualitative Research. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794118781380

Pidgeon, M. (2016). More than a checklist: Meaningful Indigenous inclusion in higher education. Social Inclusion, 4(1), 77–91. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17645/si.v4i1.436


Presented by CFICE and Community-Campus Engage Canada, in collaboration with the National Association of Friendship Centres, the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network, and the Centre for the Study of Educational Leadership and Policy (CSELP), this webinar explores answers to the guiding question How do we grow impactful Indigenous-Campus engagement and ethical research in Canada to better support indigenous community health and well being?

This webinar is now full. Please email cfice@carleton.ca to be put on the waiting list, and to receive post-webinar information. Thank you!

Indigenomics by Design Conference – 100 Billion Dollar Challenge

Facilitating the potential of a 100 Billion dollar Indigenous economyRiver Rock Casino and Resort
8811 River Rd

The Indigenomics Institute invites Indigenous nations and organizations, and private industry to be a part of the Inaugural Indigenomics Conference. Indigenomics is based on a simple premise – an invitation of ‘Who wants to play Indigenomics?’ Together, we can achieve a 100 billion dollar Indigenous economy.

Register for Indigenomics by Design Conference – 100 Billion Dollar Challenge

The Indigenomics Institute Inc. welcomes you to an Indigenous worldview at the Inaugural Conference and Research Forum on June 24, 25 & 26, 2019 at the River Rock Casino and Resort in Vancouver, BC. Indigenomics is modern Indigenous economic design, and together we moving towards a 100 Billion Dollar Indigenous Economy.

The Inaugural Indigenomics Conference 2019 will focus on the development of core economic levers for the growth of the Indigenous Economy –  there are 400 seats available. 

The Indigenomics Institute is also hosting the Re-imagining Indigenous Futurisms – Indigenous Economic Research Forum on Monday June 24, 2019. This is a stand alone event from the conference and only 60 seats available.

Community Coordinator

Our goal is to be a diverse and inclusive workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the communities we serve. We encourage applications from Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, and Persons with Disabilities. If you are a member of one of the equity groups you are encouraged to self-identify in your covering letter or your resume.

Deadline: 
10 Apr 2019

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