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Weaving Indigenous Wellbeing, Research and Ethics: Community and Campus Perspectives in Canada

12:00pm – 1:00pm Eastern Time
Online - Register for webinar link!

Cost: Free

Join us for Weaving Indigenous Wellbeing, Research and Ethics: Community and Campus Perspectives in Canada.

The webinar will feature the work and vision of four Indigenous leaders working in community-campus engagement. Two Professors from Saskatchewan and British Columbia and two community leaders from the National Association of Friendship Centres in Ottawa will focus on ethical research, Indigenous knowledges, equitable partnerships and how higher education and other Canadian allies can collectively support Indigenous community health and well being. They will explore the challenges they face, opportunities for the future, and specific recommendations for policy, funding, culture, and program changes.

Level: Beginner/Intermediate – Attendees do not need any prior experience or knowledge of indigenous research or community development. Check out the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network to learn more about the topic: www.uakn.org

Resources to read ahead of the webinar:

Pidgeon, M. (2018). Moving between theory and practice within an Indigenous research paradigm. Qualitative Research. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794118781380

Pidgeon, M. (2016). More than a checklist: Meaningful Indigenous inclusion in higher education. Social Inclusion, 4(1), 77–91. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17645/si.v4i1.436


Presented by CFICE and Community-Campus Engage Canada, in collaboration with the National Association of Friendship Centres, the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network, and the Centre for the Study of Educational Leadership and Policy (CSELP), this webinar explores answers to the guiding question How do we grow impactful Indigenous-Campus engagement and ethical research in Canada to better support indigenous community health and well being?

This webinar is now full. Please email cfice@carleton.ca to be put on the waiting list, and to receive post-webinar information. Thank you!

Indigenomics by Design Conference – 100 Billion Dollar Challenge

Facilitating the potential of a 100 Billion dollar Indigenous economyRiver Rock Casino and Resort
8811 River Rd

The Indigenomics Institute invites Indigenous nations and organizations, and private industry to be a part of the Inaugural Indigenomics Conference. Indigenomics is based on a simple premise – an invitation of ‘Who wants to play Indigenomics?’ Together, we can achieve a 100 billion dollar Indigenous economy.

Register for Indigenomics by Design Conference – 100 Billion Dollar Challenge

The Indigenomics Institute Inc. welcomes you to an Indigenous worldview at the Inaugural Conference and Research Forum on June 24, 25 & 26, 2019 at the River Rock Casino and Resort in Vancouver, BC. Indigenomics is modern Indigenous economic design, and together we moving towards a 100 Billion Dollar Indigenous Economy.

The Inaugural Indigenomics Conference 2019 will focus on the development of core economic levers for the growth of the Indigenous Economy –  there are 400 seats available. 

The Indigenomics Institute is also hosting the Re-imagining Indigenous Futurisms – Indigenous Economic Research Forum on Monday June 24, 2019. This is a stand alone event from the conference and only 60 seats available.

Community Coordinator

Our goal is to be a diverse and inclusive workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the communities we serve. We encourage applications from Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, and Persons with Disabilities. If you are a member of one of the equity groups you are encouraged to self-identify in your covering letter or your resume.

Deadline: 
10 Apr 2019

Local Organizing for Fair Economies

Join a conversation to explore how local organizing principles and approaches can contribute to the creation of more sustainable, fair and inclusive economies.

LePower Lab logod by Co-facilitators, Alejandra Bravo and Mercedes Sharpe Zayas, this interactive webinar shares the Power Lab's experience of connecting people and ideas for action to build local economies that strengthen communities and benefit everyone.

Delve into how community economic development organizations might contribute to changing social conditions for your organization’s constituencies and how the people you serve can become a base for action. Understand how to centre equity-seeking groups as primary actors in decision-making and agents of making material gains in their communities.

Resources: 

PRESENTERS

Alejandra Bravo, Director and Co-Facilitator, Power LabAlejandra Bravo

As the Director of the, Power Lab, a new leadership learning initiative focused on local organizing for a fair economy co-generated by the Atkinson Foundation and the Broadbent Institute.

Active in the community benefits movement, she supports leaders working to build campaigns and coalitions organizing for economic opportunities for historically disadvantaged and equity-seeking groups. Alejandra contributes to movement building as a facilitator, trainer, mentor and strategist with various social change efforts.

Previously she was Manager of Leadership and Learning at Maytree, where she designed and delivered political and civic training for emerging and diverse leaders. Alejandra has a 25-year history of working for progressive social change with grassroots, immigrant, and labour groups. She has worked as a community organizer, political staff and has been a City Council candidate in Toronto.

Mercedes Sharpe Zayas, Co-Facilitator, Power LabMercedes Sharpe Zayas

Mercedes Sharpe Zayas is a community planner committed to movement building and economic justice in the urban form.

Mercedes has been cultivating her participatory planning practice as the Workforce Planning Coordinator for the Parkdale People’s Economy, a network of over 30 community-based organizations and hundreds of community members organizing towards decent work, shared wealth, and equitable development in Parkdale. She has also worked as a Policy Research Intern at the City of Toronto’s Economic Development and Culture Division, a Research Assistant for the Metcalf Foundation’s Inclusive Local Economies Program, and a Graduate Research Assistant with The Public Studio.

In her spare time, Mercedes is the Co-Director of Communications for PODER, a grassroots Latinx feminist organization in Toronto. She holds a Master of Science in Urban Planning from the University of Toronto and a Bachelor of Arts in Honours Anthropology from McGill University.

    Community-Campus Partnerships for Social Infrastructure

    webinar supporters3:00pm to 4:00pm

    Universities, colleges and institutes can play a much more significant role in the design and construction of much-needed social infrastructure In Canada and globally, including affordable housing, child care centres, women’s shelters and seniors’ care facilities. The most effective and sustainable way to do this is through authentic partnerships with non-profit organizations and community groups that mobilize the necessary local knowledge and public, private and philanthropic resources to implement these complex projects.

    Register for the Community-Campus Partnerships for Social Infrastructure Webinar webinar

    As leaders in this work, Simon Fraser University (SFU) and the University of Winnipeg have valuable experience and methods to share, to spread information on innovative models and support their replication and adaptation across Canada and the world. Guided by our Moderator, Ted Jackson, our presenters—SFU President Andrew Petter and University of Winnipeg Community Renewal Corporation Managing Director Sherman Kreiner—will address the following key questions:

    • What kinds of social and green real estate projects are possible?
    • How can we structure effective community-campus governance and project-management bodies?
    • What combination of financial instruments and sources can be used to finance social infrastructure?

    Webinar participants will be invited to pose their own questions online to the presenters before and during the webinar.

    Visit the event website.

    Towards Cooperative CommonWealth: Transition in a Perilous Century

    Towards Co-operative CommonWealth: Transition in a Perilous Century social cardMar 25 - Jul 14, 2019

    Towards Co-operative CommonWealth is a master class in movement building for a new model of political economy that is sustainable, democratic, and socially just. Offered by the Synergia Institute and Athabasca University, it sets out the practical models and pathways for meaningful systems change at multiple levels. The goal: to better secure our basic needs for land, food, livelihood, social care, energy, finance and more in these increasingly difficult times.

    The course is suitable for newcomers to social change work as well as veteran activists, practitioners, policy-makers, and researchers. Individuals on their own and people working for social change through organizations, networks, and movements can leverage the course material and the expertise of the Synergia team to advance their own projects and activist work locally.

    Enrol for Towards Cooperative CommonWealth

    The course is offered in two sections: Section 1 is 4 modules over 4 weeks starting March 25th, followed by a 4 week intellectual pause to catch your breath from April 22 till May 20th, and Section 2 starts another 4 Modules from May 20th to June 22.

    Following the course, feedback from the Synergia team will be available for three weeks to promote application of course ideas & models to your own projects or work.

    *The course is free at the certificate level. The cost of degree accreditation is $269 CAD.​

    OBJECTIVES

    • Outline and explain the problematic, and transformative vision.
    • Discuss emerging food system alternatives and strategies for transitioning to just, sustainable food systems.
    • Recognize the role of public policy and bottom-up innovation in renewable community energy.
    • Become familiar with the interplay of assumptions, interests, power, and technology feeding the growing precariousness of livelihoods and the implications for human wellbeing, and to explore emerging sector-, policy-, and place-based alternatives.
    • Outline the philosophy, rationale, and organizational forms of user-controlled models of health and social care.
    • Discuss enclosure, and the alternatives of commons and land trusts.
    • Describe community development finance and co-operative capital raising and their potential to secure democratic and socially directed investment for the common good.
    • Synthesize key ideas and practices that define systemic transition.

    Target Audience: We imagine that if you were attracted to this course, you will be someone who shares our general world view and vision, and wants to broaden and deepen it and join us and others to develop it. That is its principal purpose, but a secondary purpose is to link people and projects that share these views in practical ways. You are likely to be people who are already engaged in social change work in three crucial movements – co-operation, commons, and sustainability. Most are already actively working to make this world view a reality. You may be active in the environmental movement, human or animal rights, social equality and development, the solidarity economy, co-operative finance and alternative currencies; the Transition Movement, permaculture, local food, eco-villages, the digital commons, peer-to-peer and open educational resources, community energy or many others.

    For more information about Synergia Institute visit: synergiainstitute.org

    Course is offered by Athabasca University in collaboration with Synergia.

    "System Change Not Climate Change" Banner photo is copyright (c) 2009 by Kris Krüg and made available under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.

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