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Research Principles for Working with First Nations

RPLC webinar 2:00pm Eastern Time

In this webinar, you will become acquainted with OCAP® and their online training course Fundamentals of OCAP®.

The First Nations principles of OCAP® are a set of standards that establish how First Nations data should be collected, protected, used, or shared. They are the de facto standard for how to conduct research with First Nations. Standing for ownership, control, access and possession, OCAP® asserts that First Nations have control over data collection processes in their communities, and that they own and control how this information can be used.

Register for Research Principles for Working with First Nations

Questions: Meghan Wrathall, 819-345-3777

Effective governance and policy-making is based upon sound, quality data. Rather than First Nations people being perpetual subjects of other’s research, policies like OCAP, which encourage First Nations participation in and ownership of data, contribute to effect policy making by leaders as well as ensuring research that actually meets the needs of communities themselves.

First Nations Information Governance Centre (FNIG), is a First Nations organization well-known for conducting and storing the information from our on-reserve Regional Health Surveys across Canada. We have also developed the OCAP® Principles which also help First Nations implement. Our mission is to strengthen First Nations’ data sovereignty and the development of governance and information management systems at the community level. We adhere to free, prior and informed consent, respect na-tion-to-nation relationships, and recognize the distinct customs of nations, to achieve transformative change.

When Is Collective Impact Most Impactful

Using Insights from the Collective Impact Cross-Site Study to Improve Your Impact

Collective Impact Forum3:00pm to 4:30pm Eastern Time

What do we know about the practices that lead to positive systems and population changes in collective impact initiatives?

Join us on Tuesday, May 15 from 3pm – 4:30pm ET for this free webinar to explore actionable insights gleaned from an in-depth study of 25 collective impact sites. We will discuss what we learned about the implementation of the collective impact approach, the ways in which equity practices and capacity contribute to outcomes, and how early changes and system changes contribute to population level impact.

Register for When is Colletive Impact Most Impactful

Webinar Presenters

  • Terri Akey, Director, ORS Impact
  • Lauren Gase, Senior Researcher, Spark Policy Institute
  • Jennifer Splansky Juster, Executive Director, Collective Impact Forum
  • Sarah Stachowiak, CEO, ORS Impact \

We'll be taking questions in the webinar's "chat box" so pleases bring your questions about what YOU would like to hear about.

Can't make the actual webinar time? Registering also means you'll be notified when this session is uploaded to the Collective Impact Forum resource library.

Webinar Resources:

We hope you will come join the discussion on May 15!

Intersections Between Poverty & Government Policy

Canadian Poverty InstituteThe Poverty Studies Summer Institute is a unique study opportunity that brings together students, practitioners and ministry workers into an intimate learning community. Over a 3 week period, participants will engage in active learning and discussion about the causes and impacts of poverty and best practices in how to alleviate and end it. 

The Summer Institute offers courses that respond to the material, social and spiritual dimensions of poverty providing both the knowledge and skill base to work effectively in the practice of poverty reduction. The program will consist of 3 one-week intensive courses which may be eligible for credit for Ambrose University degree programs.

Register for Poverty and Government Policy

Intersections Between Poverty & Government Policy

The course will examine the intersection of social policy and government. Students will discover how governments work, the role of the lobbyist, how a law is formed, how a law is passed, and what happens after the law is passed. The impact of the law, both positive and negative consequences, will be considered. The course will look at current Canadian social programs to determine if they empower people to move out of poverty. It will examine competing theories of anti-poverty and a range of approaches to research on poverty. Consideration will be given to welfare reform and alternative models such as Basic Income and Negative Income Tax. Students will visit the municiple council chambers to observe both council and standing policy committees. Finally, students will consider the structure of a National Poverty strategy. 

BHS 450,  June 11 - 15
Instructor: John Rook

Sociology of Poverty

Canadian Poverty InstituteThe Poverty Studies Summer Institute is a unique study opportunity that brings together students, practitioners and ministry workers into an intimate learning community. Over a 3 week period, participants will engage in active learning and discussion about the causes and impacts of poverty and best practices in how to alleviate and end it. 

The Summer Institute offers courses that respond to the material, social and spiritual dimensions of poverty providing both the knowledge and skill base to work effectively in the practice of poverty reduction. The program will consist of 3 one-week intensive courses which may be eligible for credit for Ambrose University degree programs.

Register for Sociology of Poverty

Sociology of Poverty

An examination of the social images, constructions, understandings, and experiences of poverty in Canada. It also draws on the sociological perspective to explore the causes of and possible solutions to poverty.

SO 399,  June 11 - 15
Instructor: Kristen Desjarlais-deKlerk

Building a Solidarity Economy

Transition United States2pm Eastern Time

Cooperation Humboldt exists to develop a solidarity economy across the North Coast. They identify, support and nurture local cooperative economic efforts that help people meet their needs without exploiting or oppressing anyone, without being exploited or oppressed by anyone, and commit to do so in an ecologically sustainable manner.

In this webinar, Cooperation Humboldt co-founder David Cobb will describe their theory of change, their program areas and concrete projects, and how they engage local elections to advance their agenda as a 501(c)(3).

Register for Building a Solidarity Economy

David is a "people's lawyer" who has sued corporate polluters, lobbied elected officials, run for political office himself, and been arrested for non-violent civil disobedience. He believes we must provoke—and win—a peaceful revolution if we are to survive.

David was born in rural Texas and worked as a laborer before going to college and ​then ​law school. He maintained a successful law practice before devoting himself to full-time social change efforts.

In 2002, David ran for Attorney General of Texas, pledging to use the office to revoke the charters of corporations that repeatedly violate health, safety and environmental laws. In 2004, he ran for President of the United States on the Green Party ticket and forced a recount in Ohio that helped launch the Election Integrity movement. 

In 2010 he co-founded Move To Amend, a campaign for a constitutional amendment to abolish the illegitimate, court-created doctrines of "corporate constitutional rights" and "money equals speech." In 2016 he served as the Campaign Manager for Jill Stein's presidential campaign.

In addition to his work at Cooperation Humboldt, he serves as a Fellow for the Liberty Tree Foundation ​where he facilitates "Movement School for Revolutionaries."

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