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Towards Cooperative CommonWealth: Transition in a Perilous Century

Towards Co-operative CommonWealth: Transition in a Perilous Century social cardMar 25 - Jul 14, 2019

Towards Co-operative CommonWealth is a master class in movement building for a new model of political economy that is sustainable, democratic, and socially just. Offered by the Synergia Institute and Athabasca University, it sets out the practical models and pathways for meaningful systems change at multiple levels. The goal: to better secure our basic needs for land, food, livelihood, social care, energy, finance and more in these increasingly difficult times.

The course is suitable for newcomers to social change work as well as veteran activists, practitioners, policy-makers, and researchers. Individuals on their own and people working for social change through organizations, networks, and movements can leverage the course material and the expertise of the Synergia team to advance their own projects and activist work locally.

Enrol for Towards Cooperative CommonWealth

The course is offered in two sections: Section 1 is 4 modules over 4 weeks starting March 25th, followed by a 4 week intellectual pause to catch your breath from April 22 till May 20th, and Section 2 starts another 4 Modules from May 20th to June 22.

Following the course, feedback from the Synergia team will be available for three weeks to promote application of course ideas & models to your own projects or work.

*The course is free at the certificate level. The cost of degree accreditation is $269 CAD.​

OBJECTIVES

  • Outline and explain the problematic, and transformative vision.
  • Discuss emerging food system alternatives and strategies for transitioning to just, sustainable food systems.
  • Recognize the role of public policy and bottom-up innovation in renewable community energy.
  • Become familiar with the interplay of assumptions, interests, power, and technology feeding the growing precariousness of livelihoods and the implications for human wellbeing, and to explore emerging sector-, policy-, and place-based alternatives.
  • Outline the philosophy, rationale, and organizational forms of user-controlled models of health and social care.
  • Discuss enclosure, and the alternatives of commons and land trusts.
  • Describe community development finance and co-operative capital raising and their potential to secure democratic and socially directed investment for the common good.
  • Synthesize key ideas and practices that define systemic transition.

Target Audience: We imagine that if you were attracted to this course, you will be someone who shares our general world view and vision, and wants to broaden and deepen it and join us and others to develop it. That is its principal purpose, but a secondary purpose is to link people and projects that share these views in practical ways. You are likely to be people who are already engaged in social change work in three crucial movements – co-operation, commons, and sustainability. Most are already actively working to make this world view a reality. You may be active in the environmental movement, human or animal rights, social equality and development, the solidarity economy, co-operative finance and alternative currencies; the Transition Movement, permaculture, local food, eco-villages, the digital commons, peer-to-peer and open educational resources, community energy or many others.

For more information about Synergia Institute visit: synergiainstitute.org

Course is offered by Athabasca University in collaboration with Synergia.

"System Change Not Climate Change" Banner photo is copyright (c) 2009 by Kris Krüg and made available under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 license.

History & Hope: Celebrating 20 Years of CCEDNet

1:00pm - 2:00pm Eastern Time

2019 marks CCEDNet’s 20th anniversary, but the movement for fair and inclusive economies stretches back much further...Stewart Perry: Pioneer of CED in the US and Canada

Stewart Perry is one of the pioneers of community economic development, and also CCEDNet’s first honorary lifetime member. Stewart was part of the US Office of Economic Opportunity and helped create the first federal CED support program nearly 50 years ago.

This celebratory kickoff of CCEDNet’s 20th anniversary year begins with a look back at the origins of CED, its emergence and growth, current challenges and opportunities, and a toast to the many people who have contributed to the movement we know today.   

PRESENTER

Stewart PerryStewart Perry, CED Practitioner & CCEDNet honorary lifetime member

Dr. Stewart Perry is long active in community economic development (CED) in the U.S. and Canada as both a policy adviser and a designer and manager of CED institutions. As head of the (U.S.) Center for Community Economic Development, he helped create the first finance institution for CED, the Massachusetts Community Development Finance Authority. He helped start Canada's first community development corporation, New Dawn Enterprises, and in the years 1988-1993 headed the Community Economic Development Center in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. A consultant, researcher, and author, Stewart currently specializes in community and development finance. Read his resume.

HOST

Victoria MorrisVictoria Morris, Executive Director, Saskatchewan Co-operative Association (SCA)

Victoria joined SCA in 2006, managing the Saskatchewan Co-operative Youth Program and co-operative education programming for several years. In 2008, she was appointed SCA's Executive Director. With 20 years of experience in community economic development (CED) and co-operatives, she has worked in northern, rural, and urban communities in many parts of Canada. Prior to joining SCA, she held several positions with CBC focusing on communications, managed a small non-profit in BC, and coordinated a two-year, Saskatchewan-wide multicultural youth project that reached 2,000 young people in 20 communities. Victoria served on CCEDNet's board for 12 years, and was a founding member of the Emerging Leaders Committee.  

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

An Economy for Everyone: Bold Strategies to Build Racial and Economic Equity

PolicyLinkMore than 100 million people in the United States — one in every three residents, and nearly half of all people of color — are economically insecure, with a household income below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. The new report from PolicyLink and PERE, "100 Million and Counting: A Portrait of Economic Insecurity in the United States," states that this reflects not only the toxic polarization of wealth and income but also the persistence of racial inequities throughout the economy.

Join us on January 14 to hear from leading thinkers and advocates as they discuss bold, innovative policy ideas that can transform systems and institutions to tap into the potential of people of color and low-income communities rather than locking them out of our national prosperity, so we can all share in the benefits of a more equitable and inclusive society.

Register for An Economy for Everyone

Featured Speakers:

  • Michael McAfee, President and CEO, PolicyLink
  • Sandy Fernandez, Director for the Americas, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth
  • Manuel Pastor, Director, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity and Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, USC
  • Darrick Hamilton, Executive Director, Kirwan Institute
  • Sarita Gupta, co-executive director, Jobs With Justice and the co-director of Caring Across Generations
  • Heather Boushey, executive director and chief economist, Washington Center for Equitable Growth
  • Mayor Michael Tubbs, Stockton, California (invited)

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